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O-si-yo, tsi-lu-gi: Hello and Welcome to Tribalpedia!
The information for each tribe was obtained from various sources including the Tribal websites, Wikipedia, and other educational sites involved in Native Indian history. We have condensed the material from all of these sources to make it easier for you to read. Note that not every tribe is listed. There are records for over 4000 Native American tribes, but only 513 are still recognized by the US Government. This is an ongoing project and information will be added on a continuing basis.

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For Teachers, there are links to complete Lesson Plans with Answer Keys for the following Tribes:

Tribes Located in the United States:

Background image: Dowa Yalanne, Zuni. Photo courtesy of R.Deck.
Note: Dowa Yalanne (Zuni: “Corn Mountain”) is sacred to the Zuni people. The mesa is a place for shrines and religious activities, and is closed to outside visitors.
Read more about Dowa Yalanne in our Zuni entry.
As always, thanks to Chuck Houpt
People of the Whale

Flora Aiken gives a blessing to the first bowhead whale of the spring season. Photo-Kiliii Yuyan-BBC-January 2018

“Kiliii Yuyan is an indigenous Nanai photographer who documents native cultures and wilderness conservation issues. He spent time with the Inupiat, an indigenous community from North Slope Alaska, whose lifestyle and culture is dependent on subsistence harvest of marine mammals.” BBC, January 2018-
Excerpt: The people of the whale-By Kiliii Yuyan, BBC

“Members of the community are allowed to catch limited number of bowhead whales a year from stable populations. The first boats to harpoon the whale receive shares. The lead whaling crew divide the head between them.The Inupiat have a rich spiritual life that centres around the gift of the whale to the community.”

Bill Hess’s book reveals the harsh Arctic landscape and the way of life it has wrought for the Inupiat Eskimos of Alaska.